Category Archives: Public Views

Tomorrow Starts Today – A Survey of Teachers pt. 2

photo of teacher Cecily Langford, 2008

survey by Damon Locks

The discussion continues regarding the pros and cons of educating.

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Eve Fineman, 

age 38

What subject/s do you teach? I teach upper level studios in an undergraduate Interior Architecture program, including furniture design, portfolio, thesis and independent design studios.

Where do you teach? The Illinois Institute of Art – Chicago

What age group do you teach? 20 – 50 year olds. Many of my students are non-traditional college students, on their second degrees or careers, so the average age is in the mid-twenties.

How do you measure success as it pertains to being an educator? Great question! One benchmark for me is the highest level of quality I can get my students to produce, as measured not by the strongest students but by the ones who find it the most challenging. If I can teach them to tap into their abilities and discover new strengths and a higher level of confidence, then I think I have been successful.

Additionally, my success is measured by the outcomes of the students, and whether they have gained new knowledge or skills during the course of my time teaching them. Sometimes it takes a long time to see these come to full fruition. I love seeing their talents and abilities mature once they have graduated and are putting them into practice.

What is a major factor that impedes your work as an educator? Most of my students are putting themselves through school and are taking out major loans. As a result, their schedules are insane, where they are working full-time jobs and taking 4 studio courses at a time. That is not right, and causes them extreme stress and fatigue. They are not able to put as much into the class material as I’d like them to. But I don’t blame them, I blame the system that has caused higher education to be prohibitively expensive.

Do you think you will be a teaching in 10 years? YES!!! If I am lucky, I will be teaching alongside some of my brilliant former students.
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Therese Quinn, age 52

What subject/s do you teach? Art education classes related to teaching art in schools, like fieldwork and apprentice teaching seminars, and histories, theories and philosophies of American public education, and sometimes classes that connect to museums.

Where do you teach? School of the Art Institute of Chicago

What age group do you teach? College, both undergraduate and graduate levels

How do you measure success as it pertains to being an educator? Through the engagement and successes of my students, such as when they go on to teach in public schools across the city and country, and develop exhibits for museums, and publish their writing about teaching and everything else they do.

What is a major factor that impedes your work as an educator? Our national lack of regard for teachers of any subject, and specifically, the way our social understanding of “artist” is so limited (only for a few very special people, and not a way of understanding and responding the world that all of us should be able to access) and often precludes other identities, like “teacher.”

Do you think you will be a teaching in 10 years? Yes, teaching is intellectually challenging and political work, and always dynamic. And teaching people who will go on to be teachers, and doing this in Chicago–well, there’s nothing more exciting. Chicago has always been at the sharp edge of thinking about public education; from Jane Addams and John Dewey’s work in progressive and socially engaged education, to the initiation of elected Local School Councils in the 1980s, on through to Mayor Daley’s takeover of the Chicago Public Schools and Arne Duncan’s failed attempts to raise scores by closing public schools and opening quasi-private charter schools–this is the city where all education ideas and practices, good and bad, get tested. I can’t think of any kind of labor that is more interesting right now.
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Nicole Mitchell

What subject/s do you teach? Jazz History and Jazz Ensemble

What age group do you teach? I teach high school and at a university.

How do you measure success as it pertains to being an educator? I measure success by enthusiasm, independence, inspiration and development of the students.

What is a major factor that impedes your work as an educator? The major factor that impedes my work is the complication of being a professional artist in my field and teaching. Teaching schedules can be very strict which limits my accessibility to students. If institutions can be more supportive and flexible with active artists, students will be able to benefit more.

Do you think you will be a teaching in 10 years? I will be teaching in 10 years because teaching and mentorship is part of the balance in my lifestyle. It’s important to give to the future.

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Kelly Kuvo a.k.a. Ms. Richardson, age 40

What subject/s do you teach? Fundamentals of Art, Arts and Crafts, Ceramics

Where do you teach? Baltimore City Public Schools, currently at Heritage High School

What age group do you teach? Middle/High School students ages 13 -21

How do you measure success as it pertains to being an educator? Students completed art projects & improvement in art skills over time, student understanding of principles of art/elements of design/aesthetics: describing, analyzing, interpreting, and judging their own and others artworks both verbally in class and in writing on a critique worksheet. Student work being chosen to represent my school in city and state-wide art exhibitions.

What is a major factor that impedes your work as an educator? Inept school administrators that have no interest in understanding what I do as an art teacher, nor the amount of supplies I need and why I’ll need them, and no concept of the extra time it takes to prepare art materials before each lesson in contrast to other subject area teachers who simply work with paper worksheets and pen/pencil everyday.

Do you think you will be a teaching in 10 years? Yes, in New York City or Los Angeles. Definitely not in Baltimore

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Diane Lena, age 42

Where do you teach? Early Childhood Montessori, Oscar Mayer Magnet school in Lincoln Park

What age group do you teach? 3-6 year olds

How do you measure success as it pertains to being an educator? I measure my success as an educator by observing my students and my classrooms environment. Are my students happy? Are they excited about learning new things. Are they working together as a community? I know I am successful I see my students teaching each other, talking to each other about what they have learned, and asking question to deepen their understanding.

What is a major factor that impedes your work as an educator? Developmentally inappropriate expectations. Many administrators do not have or even try to a thorough understanding of child development.There is a trend to make preschool more academic. I do believe it is important to challenge children, but not pushing to the point of frustration.

Another impeding factor is the lack of appreciation or understanding of the importance of the creative thought process in education.

Do you think you will be a teaching in 10 years? I do think I’ll be teaching or involved in education in 10 years. It will hopefully be in my own school or a school that has been developed with people that share the same educational philosophy as me.

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Olivia, age 37

What subject/s do you teach? Humanities – integrated English Lang Arts, Spanish Lang Arts, Social Studies, Fine and Folk Arts

Where do you teach? I taught 6-8th grades for 10 years at Telpochcalli Elementary school, a small CPS school in La Villita at 24th and California. This has been my first year out of my regular classroom – now am working with other schools and teaching workshops for teachers to help them build strong dual language programs so our students emerge bilingual, biliterate, and “culturally competent.” I also co-teach a Social Studies methods course at the U of C for their Urban Ed grad program.

How do you measure success as it pertains to being an educator? A successful teacher should be measured by the individual growth of each student they have taught and by their ability to reach every student in some powerful way. When still students call me for advice 10 years later, when they have the courage to express their individual identity no matter the pressure to conform, when they retain the artifacts and memories of our learning experiences together, when they have fish, know how to fish, have explored the metacognitive process of learning to fish, have written poetry about the…you get it, when they demonstrate that they have had experiences that they can build on and have developed tools with which to do so – those are the measures of my success.

What is a major factor that impedes your work as an educator? The biggest challenges to my work are 1) the intellectual laziness of many grownups with power 2) shallow attitudes about language and culture 3) policy and infrastructure that do not support solid teaching practices, most awfully, assessment practices that delegitimize any demonstration of learning that doesn’t lend itself to quantifiable measure.

Do you think you will be a teaching in 10 years? I will definitely be teaching in 10 years.

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M. Brooks, age 43

What subject/s do you teach? English as a Second Language

How do you measure success as it pertains to being an educator? I measure success by the amount of interest I can generate in a student to learn and to recognize the importance of becoming a life long learner. This is measurable through a change in attitude towards grades, achieving higher grades, doing better in class and in school etc…This is not how success is generally measured by school systems who like to focus on standardized test scores mostly.

What is a major factor that impedes your work as an educator? The major factor that impedes my work as an educator is not having enough time to do all of the things I am required to do adequately…not having enough time to work with struggling students. Also, not being paid over the summer and not receiving raises has made it necessary to get a part-time job which means less energy for working with my students.

Do you think you will be a teaching in 10 years? I will not be teaching in 10 years. Hopefully, I will have moved on!

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Mary Dominis, age 43 yrs

Where do you teach? Mesa, Arizona

What age group do you teach? Kindergarten for 11 years

How do you measure success as it pertains to being an educator? I know I have experienced success when any one, and hopefully all of my students make gains academically, sociallly and emotionally throughout the school year. I also measure my success by my student’s level of comfort and joy in the learning process and the environment I provide. It is one of my goals to personally connect with each of my students at least once per day, via handshake, hug, quiet conversation at my desk etc. It also is one of my goals to share laughter in the class each day. My passion for multicultural studies, literature and music is also shared in my class as a way to teach tolerance and inspire an interest in the arts.

What is a major factor that impedes your work as an educator? The incredible amount of government, state and local district red hoops that teachers are being forced to jump through. I understand that there is a need for continuing education and checks and balances, but these things have gotten completely out of control. Teachers have endless meetings and are required to do ridiculous amounts of paper work leaving very littlte time for preparation and actual teaching. Kindergarten began a version of standardized testing several years ago and we are now being pressured to teach for test scores as scores are tied into our salaries.

Do you think you will be a teaching in 10 years? Not sure. I have been thinking about alternative occupations for several years now. I make very little money and am finding it more difficult each year to survive on a teacher’s salary. My garbage man makes ten dollars more per hour than I do for driving around in an air conditioned cab with a robotic arm that picks up and dumps the trash for him.

I do however have a passion for teaching and as long as I can find joy in what I do despite all of the aggravations I spoke of, I will continue to teach.

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Marliese Colantuno Roth, age 43

What subject/s do you teach?/ What age group do you teach? The Montessori curriculum is interdisciplinary, so I teach all subjects.  As Montessori educators, we are coached not to “teach subjects” in the conventional sense; rather we prepare a rich environment in which children can select from beautiful hands-on materials that interest them, teaching themselves via their own investigations and experimentation, with our guidance as asked for or needed.  This is true at every level. Also, a fundamental component of the Montessori method is a mixed age grouping comprised of a three-year span, so Montessori guides are prepared to offer lessons over not one, but three years’ worth of curriculum.  For the age group for which I am trained (which encompasses children from 2.5 years old through 6 years old), this includes Peace Education; Practical Life Skills; Sensorial Experiences; Language Arts; Mathematics; Science and Nature; History, Social Studies, and Geography; Art, Movement, and Music.

Where do you teach: I have been working with children since I was in high school; my high school ran a pre-school as part of its Child Development Program.  Currently I teach adult educators at The Institute for Advanced Montessori Studies, a graduate-level teacher preparation program housed on the campus of the Barrie School in Silver Spring, Maryland.  Since 2000 I have held this position concurrently with my work as a teacher of young children.  Since 2007 I have been teaching at my own Montessori program in Mount Airy, Maryland.

How do you measure success as it pertains to being an educator? I will share with you a quote from my Montessori mentor, Tim Seldin, of the Montessori Foundation:  “Education, properly done, is nothing more than holistic environmental engineering designed to meet human needs.  The purpose of Montessori education is to facilitate the development of self-actualized human beings in percentages dramatically greater than occur normally in the human race by chance.”  Although the children in her programs were known for remarkable academic achievements, it is this that Dr. Montessori described this as the most important result of our work.  So it is this I use as my paramount consideration.

I evaluate my efficacy not only from the perspective of what academic material the children demonstrate that they are learning, retaining, and applying, but by numerous other factors as well.  These might include the demeanor, moods, and character development of the individual children with whom I work; the level of cleanliness, order, and spontaneous care for the environment that the children achieve; the depth of their concentration while they are working independently; the kindness and care with which they treat each other; the level of harmony and creativity in our environments; the quality of the relationships between my colleagues and the families with whom we work; and so on.  I look for clear evidence of each child’s independent and joyful scholarship and their skills as individuals and in a group managing their own spontaneous interactions with one another.  

What is a major factor that impedes your work as an educator? Education, and educators in general, suffer from a lack of respect.  Beyond that, within the field of education, as well as in the mind of the general public, Montessori education, like other models called “Partnership Models” by Riane Eisler (see Tomorrow’s Children), is still not well understood by the dominant culture, and therefore is not highly valued.  I would not necessarily say that this impedes my work, however it is a factor that makes it challenging. By way of example, Montessori educators in general are required to have significantly more training than conventional educators and have a significantly greater workload, while often making a lot less money and having fewer benefits, less job security, less free time, less planning time, and less access to resources for their students than their counterparts in conventional programs.   Another factor that I can identify as a challenge is the ambiguity in people’s minds as to the most important purposes of education.  Thus we are further hampered in our efforts by the fact that the “debates” about how to “reform” education are largely focused around what I see as meaningless, irrelevant, or erroneous aspects of this puzzle.  Additionally, teachers are often convenient scapegoats in the political process, while at the same time, we are prevented from doing what we know from experience would work better, and prevented from being innovative; none of this serves the best interests of children.  In the meantime, as a society, we continue to confuse symptom for cause, and continue to do more of what doesn’t work.  When it “fails”, we continue to attempt to apply the same approach with more determination, being punitive to teachers and children in the process.

Do you think you will be teaching in 10 years? In words also attributed to Michelangelo:  “I am still learning.”  I hope to be still learning always, and yes, I do envision myself continuing on this path, continuing to be a part of illuminating possible pathways for others, as was done for me; continuing to define my role for myself, continuing to expand what it means, and continuing to expand my job description accordingly as I go…

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Donna Wipf, age 38

What subject/s do you teach? Language Arts, Science

Where do you teach? Mitchell School

What age group do you teach? 6th-8th graders

How do you measure success as it pertains to being an educator? There’s student engagement. Do they want to be at my school? In my class? Learning what I present? Are they enthusiastic? Are they treated as if they have something worthwhile to contribute? Are they given opportunities to discuss important issues, concepts, and thoughts?

Then there’s the class climate. Have I created an environment where students enjoy both the learning and the socializing? Are they kind to one another? Are they learning to be good people? Am I modeling tolerance and an openness to new ideas?

Am I providing them with a variety of opportunities to learn outside the classroom? Are they exposed to things they would not otherwise experience?

Obviously there’s the curriculum content, skills, knowledge, and tests they have to pass. I want my students to test well, and go on to succeed in high school and college. Is every student being challenged at her/his level? Is our school progressing? We use a variety of data and assessments to ensure we are meeting academic goals.

Then there are the small, individual successes that are hard to quantify, but often are my favorite. Anai, a bilingual student is starting to joke around in English. Frank, a “very special” student is behaving more appropriately this year. Kadaivion, a boy who lives with grandma because his mom was shot and killed has started talking about high school, college, and his future career goals. Daniella, who’s home is incredibly troubled, has started really loving what we read, and writing about her ideas. Anselmo promised not to be like George Bush during his speech for student council president.

Then there’s my teaching. Am I improving? Trying new ways to present materials? Am I learning as an educator and challenging myself? Do I love what I do? And I definitely do.

What is a major factor that impedes your work as an educator?
I have two:
1. Time! We basically get paid for the time we teach, but do not get paid for the time it takes to prepare lessons, grade papers, meet with parents, organize the classroom, tutor students, etc. At my school we do get 50min per day, but that does not even begin to be enough time to do it all.

2. Babysitting “difficult” students. It can be difficult, even in a good school, to give the “good” kids the attention they deserve if “difficult” or noisier students command your attention.

Do you think you will be a teaching in 10 years? This is my 13th year. Not sure if I’ll be teaching 10 more. Probably

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Tomorrow Starts Today – A Survey of Teachers pt. 1

photo of teacher Lucille Ellis, 1972

survey by Damon Locks

With the education system a heated topic of discussion in this country, I wanted to talk to those that are on the front lines of the battle to educate, to find out how they  feel about their jobs. With all of the hardships that face an educator today…do the pros outweigh the cons? Here is a healthy sampling of teachers’ thoughts about; teaching, learning, growth, inspiration, compensation, their investment in the process and the system that surrounds it.

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Carlos Patino, age 39

What subject/s do you teach? 5th grade everything- Language Arts, Math, Science, Social Studies

Where do you teach? in Bucktown at a CPS elementary school (Burr)

What age group do you teach? 10-11 year olds

How do you measure success as it pertains to being an educator? I measure success as helping my students attain the Illinois learning standards. That said, I also measure success knowing that I have improved my students’ achievement and been a positive role model in their lives.

What is a major factor that impedes your work as an educator? A work day that is too short, excessive and unrealistic demands, non supportive administration

Do you think you will be a teaching in 10 years? I will be a principal or assistant principal. If that does not occur then I will still be teaching in classroom

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Diyan, age 38.75

What subject/s do you teach? Printmaking (all kinds, all levels), Multiples in Contemporary Practice, Drawing

Where do you teach? Emily Carr University, Vancouver BC

What age group do you teach? 17+

How do you measure success as it pertains to being an educator? This is a hard one, because the results are sometimes only visible years later. But there are a number of things that I look at in measuring how I’m doing. One, is designing curriculum that’s interesting, challenging, and hopefully relevant, that the students respond to and engage with. Two, is seeing students’ work develop and refine over the course of working with them. Three, would be seeing students open up and further develop their critical thinking, questioning their own as well as my assumptions.

What is a major factor that impedes your work as an educator? I would say funding for students, the cost of education and living for students in a city as expensive as Vancouver especially. So many of my students work many hours as well as go to school to fund their education, they don’t have the luxury of time or money to really mull over and experiment and play and discover — there’s anxiety about grades and having solid job-applicable skills.

Do you think you will be a teaching in 10 years? Yes. I taught my first class 14 years ago. I’m still teaching now. I can’t imagine what I’d be doing if I wasn’t teaching in some way, shape or form. It’s a lot of work, often very exhausting, but so rewarding. The interactions, the people I meet and learn from, the conversations around art and ideas and making things…I wouldn’t trade that.

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Sarah Lasken, age 32

What subject/s do you teach? Humanities

Where do you teach? YWLCS (Young Women’s Leadership Charter School)

What age group do you teach? 10th grade

How do you measure success as it pertains to being an educator? Student engagement, and student’s ability to synthesize a difficult topic.

What is a major factor that impedes your work as an educator? The current obsession with testing is problematic. Not because tests can not be a helpful indicator of student success, but because their test scores are often treated like the only important measure of success. We do a lot more then prep students to circle a, b, c, or d.

Do you think you will be a teaching in 10 years? I hope so. But, teaching jobs are fast disappearing. I worry that in a few years I may not be able to find a position anymore.

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Gwen Fagan, age 45

What subject/s do you teach? Life Studies, Materials and Processes, Fiber Manipulation, Visual Studies, Critical Studies, Drawing and Painting, Combined Materials.

Where do you teach? I teach at Ballyfermot College in Dublin, Ireland.

What age group do you teach? Students are typically 18 – 23 yrs of age, with a few mature students thrown in for good measure.

How do you measure success as it pertains to being an educator? One thing that has stuck with me since I studied with Steve Waldek at SAIC, was when he said to me, “Part of what I do is to help you learn how to teach yourself.” If I could impart that ability to my own students, I would consider myself successful as an educator.

What is a major factor that impedes your work as an educator? I think the main impediment to my work as an educator is the red tape which has a tendency to slow processes.

Do you think you will be a teaching in 10 years? I do think I will be teaching in ten years, yes. I love it.

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Danielle Beverly, age 40+

What subject/s do you teach? I teach Intermediate 16mm Film Production, Advanced 16mm Film Production, Screenwriting and Women & Documentary.

Where do you teach? The University of Notre Dame

What age group do you teach? My students average age 20-21, but there will be a few Sophomores next semester.

How do you measure success as it pertains to being an educator?
I measure success by engaging students to think in ways they might not have before. I want to blow their minds with films, with ideas, and with the sudden realization of their own creative and cognitive abilities. I see teaching as a way to help them think about the world, and about others who may be unlike them in many ways, but ultimately human just like them. If I can do that, there has been success. The rest is up to them.

What is a major factor that impedes your work as an educator? I’m very lucky to have a great deal of professional and personal support at Notre Dame, and very small classes. So there are very few factors (yet, I’ve just started) that impede my work. I wish students would speak up more however, and am sick of the sound of my own voice.

Do you think you will be a teaching in 10 years? I’m not sure if I will be teaching in 10 years. I’m “trying it on” again after a long period as a freelance documentary filmmaker – one that took me all over the country and provided lots of freedom and excitement, while I lived paycheck to paycheck. Part of me bristles at having any sort of routine or commitment! But the other part that I’m currently embracing is that teaching offers so many resources: to equipment, grants, colleagues, books, and even things like printers and computers! It is also forcing me to re-engage with my craft and the scholarship informing my craft so that I can serve my students. So in that way, it’s making my mind sharp and curious again. I’m thinking that if academia will have me, then I will have it

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Anonymous, age 33

What subject/s do you teach? Asian American Studies, film, and anthropology

What age group do you teach? I teach college undergrads and occasionally graduate students.

How do you measure success as it pertains to being an educator? I measure success by how engaged the students are and by how well they understand the material.

What is a major factor that impedes your work as an educator? A major factor for impeding my work is not having enough time to prepare. This is because I’m currently a graduate student. I’m hoping conditions improve when I’m done with schooling.

Do you think you will be a teaching in 10 years? I will be teaching in ten years, i hope.

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Mara, age 43

What subject/s do you teach? History (U.S., world, women’s) and an interdisciplinary course called Politics and Film.

Where do you teach? University at Albany and JHU Center for Talented Youth (Princeton site)

What age group do you teach? College and high-school

How do you measure success as it pertains to being an educator? Most of my students take my classes because they are required, so if I can convince a few of them each semester that studying history is not the worst thing that ever happened to them, I feel I’ve done well. (Having a student tell me they’ve decided to become a history major after taking my class is the ultimate.) Judging the success of a particular course is very subjective and changeable since it depends as much on the particular group of students as it does on anything I bring to the classroom.

What is a major factor that impedes your work as an educator? Number 1 is the extremely low pay. The ugly truth is that this affects the amount of work I am willing to do. The second factor is very poorly prepared students. I have college students who have trouble with reading comprehension, grasping basic concepts, and writing. This makes it very challenging to teach history and critical thinking.

Do you think you will be a teaching in 10 years? Yes, I hope so. Despite the obstacles, I love teaching. It is fun, challenging, and intellectually stimulating as few things are.
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Leslie Lockett, age 29

What subject/s do you teach? I teach Special Ed Literature, Composition, and Civics. I co-teach the Lit/Comp classes with general ed. teachers (not certified in special ed.)

Where do you teach? I teach at Rowe-Clark Math & Science Academy (A Noble Street Charter School.)

What age group do you teach? I teach 9th grade.

How do you measure success as it pertains to being an educator? It’s really hard to answer this question. I measure success by how I feel at the end of the day. If I feel I had positive interactions all day and that at least one student learned something new, I usually feel good. I also like when they use correct subject verb agreement. That always feels good.

What is a major factor that impedes your work as an educator? The amount of paperwork that I have to do sometimes impedes my work as an educator. When I worked for CPS, I didn’t feel like I was really a teacher at all.

Do you think you will be a teaching in 10 years? I most definitely hope to be teaching in 10 years.

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Stephen Haynes, age 55

What subject/s do you teach? I work one on one with autistic children

Where do you teach? local high school

What age group do you teach? 16-18

How do you measure success as it pertains to being an educator? Daily, in small bites. As a child of the sixties, I believe change is affected on a small scale in an intimate fashion.

What is a major factor that impedes your work as an educator? Level of pay. Non-recognition of my life experience. I am “under-employed”

Do you think you will be a teaching in 10 years? I have always taught in one manner or another, formally and/or informally. You cannot truly learn and NOT be charged with transmitting knowledge. This is the bodhisattva factor. you dig?! My work continues to keep me in intimate contact with humility… really.  Life continues to be an unfolding mystery.

 

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Allison Vivian Fine, age 61

What subject/s do you teach? English, Creative Writing, Literature, College Writing, Communications, Theatre Arts, Dramaturge, Acting, Directing (not all at once and not all at Westwood College–I am currently only teaching Literature and Writing there)

Where do you teach? Westwood College

What age group do you teach? adults 20-40 and beyond

How do you measure success as it pertains to being an educator? Impossible to tell at this time. If, at the end of the term, my students have a more positive attitude toward reading and writing and can write a coherent paragraph!

What is a major factor that impedes your work as an educator? The school I work for, the admissions policy, the administration, the educational background of the students who attend (appalling) and the corporate policy of the loathesome for-profit college paradigm.

Do you think you will be a teaching in 10 years? I sure F(**&&* hope not! I am a full fledged artist–writer, actor, director and musician. If I am not dead in 10 years I want to be working full time at my craft(s) achieving some audience and success and earning a living at it!

see more responses to the survey in Tomorrow Starts Today part 2

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Public Views: A Survey of Police from the Baltimore Washington Metropolitan Area

Ford_Crown_Victoria_Interceptor_DCsurvey coordinated by Damon Locks and Detective Gregg Pemberton

This idea came about when I was working on the WDC issue of Stop Smiling magazine. When brainstorming about our nation’s capital, I thought it would be a great idea to hear from the men and women in blue regarding their feelings about their jobs. With the help of Detective Gregg Pemberton, some questions were put together and inquiries were made. The survey was cut from the issue of Stop Smiling. Luckily, The Population can serve as a venue for such ideas. Here are some thoughts from those sworn to serve and protect.



Officer Joe Gentile – Third District Auto Theft Unit, – MPD

Metropolitan Police Department, WDC, 3-5 years

age: 25-29

race: Caucasian (Non-Hispanic)

gender: Male

 

On the average, how do you think the public views the police?

Neutral. The only extremes are on the negative side, for the most part. It is very rare to see/read anything about extremely positive views of the police.

What do you think is the biggest factor that prevents individual police officers from being able to do their job as best as possible?

The low morale at MPD makes it difficult to be doing your best at work. It takes a strong-willed officer to cut through all that and do the best they can.

How would you change your job to make it better and more effective for you?

I would overhaul recruiting and hiring. The department needs to make you earn the job through testing and interviews. Therefore, you can weed out people  that don’t really want to do the job or are unqualified. The hiring process needs to be more in-depth and challenging like most agencies.

What frustrates you about your job? (Citizens, Criminal Justice System, Discipline, Management, Inability to get things done right, etc.)

The aspects that trouble me the most are poor management and poor training of new recruits. In my opinion, new recruits need to be challenged in the academy and expected to perfrom at a high level throughout. This is not the case. Also, the promotional process needs to be revamped, in the sense that if you are an officer that works in an administrative position for many years (i.e. payroll) and you get promoted, you aren’t sent to lead a squad of patrol officers. They need to promote people to lead what they are skilled at.

_____________________________________________________________________________

 

Jimmy Paul, Trooper First Class, Executive Protection Section

Maryland State Police, 3-5 years

age: 30-35

race: Asian

gender: Male

 

On the average, how do you think the public views the police?

Neutral. I think there are an equal number among the public who view the police in a negative light as there are those who see them in a positive light.

What do you think is the biggest factor that prevents individual police officers from being able to do their job as best as possible?

It is a combination of what the citizens want the police to do along with what the department wants you to do. The job itself is pretty easy, as in what you are required to do. It is the people involved, both the citizens and the superiors, who make it hard. The citizens want you to lower the crime but do not like being inconvenienced. The superiors want you to lower crime as well, but make you jump through hoops to do it (redundant forms, reports etc).

How would you change your job to make it better and more effective for you?

I would let the officers do the right thing and do their jobs. It may come at the cost of a few complaints from citizens but you can never make everyone happy. At the end of the day, everyone goes home safe. That should be the goal.

What frustrates you about your job? (Citizens, Criminal Justice System, Discipline, Management, Inability to get things done right, etc.)

All of the above. Each aspect that is listed above could be improved upon in my department. They all play a pivotal role in Trooper’s frustrations.

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Officer Sarah Yeaw, Officer, Third District Vice Unit, MPD

Metropolitan Police Department, WDC, 1-2 years

age: 25-29

race: Caucasian (Non-Hispanic)

gender: Female

 

On the average, how do you think the public views the police?

Negatively. It depends where you work but the media puts a lot of negative stuff out, which colors people’s view

What do you think is the biggest factor that prevents individual police officers from being able to do their job as best as possible?

In patrol, it’s a lack of resources and personnel to allow officers to do much self-initiated work or investigations. There’s just too few people and too many radio runs to answer, so there’s no time left to really take on any investigations.

What frustrates you about your job? (Citizens, Criminal Justice System, Discipline, Management, Inability to get things done right, etc.)

The juvenile justice system! The vast majority of our part 1 offenses are committed by juveniles. But the vast majority of those who arrested are either given a few months in a halfway house (where they can leave during the day and continue to commit crimes, and also run away multiple times without receiving any further punishment), or they are not even charged at all! They learn very quickly that they can do whatever they want and essentially get away with it. There needs to be much stricter punishments for these kids, or else the crime will continue to rise out of control.

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Narcotics Detective

Baltimore City Police Department, 8-10 years

age: 35+

race: Caucasian (Non-Hispanic)

gender: Male

 

On the average, how do you think the public views the police?

Negatively. It largely depends on the area. Some areas love the police, while others hate them.

What do you think is the biggest factor that prevents individual police officers from being able to do their job as best as possible?

The department and politicians lack of support for their officers. Officers are policing with one hand tied behind their backs. This view that the community is always right, demoralizes and de-motivates officers to get involved in fighting crime.

How would you change your job to make it better and more effective for you?

Command staff needs to know that (especially in narcotics) there are going to be complaints. The majority of the people we deal with are felons and don’t want to go to jail. Therefore, don’t always entertain the absurd complaints.

What frustrates you about your job? (Citizens, Criminal Justice System, Discipline, Management, Inability to get things done right, etc.)

Citizens in high crime areas want a crime reduction, yet hate your guts at the same time. This makes for a tough environment to win over popularity. Also, to have multiple cases where criminals with 15+ arrests are still on the street is ridiculous. Inner city juries don’t convict very easily. This is frustrating for police who work hard everyday.

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Gregg Pemberton, Detective, Criminal Investigations Division, Seventh District, MPD

Metropolitan Police Department, WDC, 

age: 30-35

race: Caucasian (Non-Hispanic)

gender: Male

 

On the average, how do you think the public views the police?

Negatively.

What do you think is the biggest factor that prevents individual police officers from being able to do their job as best as possible?

Police departments strategies and operational plans are all too often motivated by politics and public outcry, rather than actual time tested policing techniques. This forces officers to constantly be “reactionary” to the demands of the public, preventing them from aggressive patrols and quality investigations, the bread and butter of crime prevention.

How would you change your job to make it better and more effective for you?

I would allow the officers to dictate how they would like to address the given issues in their area or their concentration. Crime trends and criminal activity changes so quickly, that only the officers with their boots on the street know the best way to attack a particular problem. All too often, officials develop plans that please citizens concerns, but don’t address the root of the problem.

What frustrates you about your job? (Citizens, Criminal Justice System, Discipline, Management, Inability to get things done right, etc.)

It just seems that bad guys never get any punishment around here. Even violent, armed felons can walk away with little or no jail time. Then when they’re released back out on the street to commit more crimes, the citizens blame the police for not doing anything. The public sometimes doesn’t benefit from our hard work and also doesn’t always understand the criminal justice system. This makes people quick to blame police for spikes in crime.

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Officer Matthew Mahl, PSA 302 (Columbia Heights) Patrol

Metropolitan Police Department, WDC, 3-5 years

age: 25-29

race: Caucasian (Non-Hispanic)

gender: Male

 

On the average, how do you think the public views the police?

Very negatively.

What do you think is the biggest factor that prevents individual police officers from being able to do their job as best as possible?

Over the last several years, the police department has started to cater to the citizens of our patrol areas. It seems that management in an attempt to gather public support forgets that we are running a police department. At times the police department chooses to do things that have no effect on crime, but satisfies the public. This hinders my job greatly.

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Travis Eagan Officer Patrol (FTO)

Metropolitan Police Department, WDC, 3-5 years

age: 35+

race: Caucasian (Non-Hispanic)

gender: Male

 

On the average, how do you think the public views the police?

Negatively

What do you think is the biggest factor that prevents individual police officers from being able to do their job as best as possible?

The politics of this city and the powers that are allowing the citizens to run things.

How would you change your job to make it better and more effective for you?

Do away with the added footbeats and put the officers back in cruisers and allow them to do there job as they are trained to do. The foot beats are to appease the citizens and do little to fight crime.

What frustrates you about your job? (Citizens, Criminal Justice System, Discipline, Management, Inability to get things done right, etc.)

Citizens’ ability to twist the arm of Management.

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